Italian lawyer Gian Luca Mignogna discussed the current work of the Lazio Consumers’ Committee and their complaints against certain media groups in an interview with Italian radio broadcaster Radio Incontro Olympia yesterday.

The Consumer Committee is carrying out very important work to protect Lazio, Lazio fans and the club’s brand. We thought that it would take longer but the developments have been immediate, even at Agcom there is now a pending investigation procedure.

Objectively speaking, I did not expect this speed, I must compliment these bodies that have opened their proceedings on very important issues in a very short time.

The Italian lawyer highlighted the groups that the Biancocelesti are complaining against, including Milano based newspaper la Gazzetta dello Sport.

In the complaint we have included all of Cairo Communications, including La7, but we have also involved Rai which, as a public service, cannot afford to use certain words when investigations are still open.

We certainly cannot carry out a war on the world, but we believe that we have acted in a fairly targeted manner.

It is clear that these accusations against Lazio have experienced an unstoppable progression, in particular in the Gazzetta dello Sport, where for 15-20 days there have been front-page articles, up to and including in-depth articles that suggested that who knows what violations had taken place even before the investigations were officially opened.

It is a dangerous precedent, because a newspaper has created a presumed ‘notitia criminis’, which then originated the opening of criminal investigations, mandatory by the Constitution, whose costs, however, are borne entirely by the community. In the end, the Court of Auditors should also be consulted.

Finally, Mignogna tried to understand why the media seemed to be attacking the Biancocelesti so much.

It would take a sociologist to understand what has caused the vehemence of these attacks against Lazio. The battle for TV rights and a position in the management staff of the FIGC and the League explain it in part, but obviously it all seems excessive in any case.